Brewers Quay Port of London | WW2 Photos

Images from East London showing the destruction from German bombs during World War Two. Images scanned from a genuine copy of The London Evening news magazine, handed down to me from my grandfather.



Brewers Quay – Tower Stairs

One of the oldest wharves in the Port of London was hit several times in Germany’s earliest attacks on the Port. It was finally destroyed on the night of December 29th, 1940.

The Dutch services of the General Steam Navigation Company, oldest sea-going steamship company in the world, were run from this quay, and one of their ships is moored alongside in the upper photo.

Now from the river there is a view of desolation to Lower Thames Street, up Beer Lane to great Tower Street, and on to the ruined areas of Seething Lane, Mark Lane and Mincing Lane.

Brewers Quay, Port of London

Brewers Quay, Port of London

Brewers Quay, Port of London

Brewers Quay, Port of London

East London History - East End Facts

Malcolm Oakley - East London History - A Guide to London's East End.

I grew up on the fringes of London's true East End and have been fascinated by the ever changing history and landscape of the area.

Visitors and tourists to London may only ever explore the City centre but for those that care to travel further east, a rich and rewarding travel adventure awaits. So much of London's history owes a debt to the East End. Colourful characters, famous architecture, hidden treasures of changing life over the years.

Author by Malcolm Oakley.

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Posted in East End Locations

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