Saddlers Hall Cheapside | WW2 Photos

Images from East London showing the destruction from German bombs during World War Two. Images scanned from a genuine copy of The London Evening news magazine, handed down to me from my grandfather.



Saddler’s Hall – 40 Gutter Lane London

The following account was written just after the War ended. Between Foster Lane and Gutter Lane, and behind Cheapside’s north facade, lay handsome Saddler’s Hall. Hitler’s fire-bombs fell on surrounding buildings on the night of December 29th, 1940, the night the water supply failed in the City, and the fires spread.

There is nothing left on the extensive site today but the broken marble pillars of the Saddler’s entrance, 141 Cheapside. Not only did the Worshipful Company’s hall go up in flames, but all the Cheapside shops were lost.

Saddler’s Hall, the third on the site, was built in 1822, the buildings along the Cheapside pavement in 1863-4. The Company’s first hall, built in 1396, went in the fire of 1666.

Saddlers Hall Cheapside London

Saddlers Hall Cheapside London

Saddlers Hall Cheapside London

Saddlers Hall Cheapside London

East London History - East End Facts

Malcolm Oakley - East London History - A Guide to London's East End.

I grew up on the fringes of London's true East End and have been fascinated by the ever changing history and landscape of the area.

Visitors and tourists to London may only ever explore the City centre but for those that care to travel further east, a rich and rewarding travel adventure awaits. So much of London's history owes a debt to the East End. Colourful characters, famous architecture, hidden treasures of changing life over the years.

Author by Malcolm Oakley.

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Posted in East End Locations

One comment on “Saddlers Hall Cheapside | WW2 Photos
  1. Lloyd Unstead says:

    I found your East End Facts very interesting especially as myself and a friend are working within the M25 photographing plaques, statues etc. At the moment we have taken over 3600 so you can see when we find something of interest like your East End Facts we can log anything of importance to us on our maps to be photographed. If you have any further information that you think might be of interest to us, would you be kind enough to forward it as we believe history should not be buried and there for all to see.

    Regards Lloyd

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