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Learn more about famous and infamous London East End locations.

Haunted London Undergroud

Ten Hauntings On The London Underground

The London Underground has been in service for over 150 years, with the Thames Tunnel opening in 1843 to make it the world’s oldest underground rail network. Millions of commuters, tourists and regular Londoners use the Underground every day without incident, but the truth is that the Underground has a murky past which has resulted in a lot of ghostly sightings and hauntings.

The Stabbed Actor of Covent Garden

Covent Garden is right in the centre of London’s West End,

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Tower of London Trivia

Tower of London Trivia

The Tower of London is a must-see attraction for any tourist visiting England’s capital city. But for those keen to look deeper than Beefeaters, executions and ravens, here are five lesser known facts about the Tower.

1: Going Up in the World

Why does the staircase in the White Tower spiral up in a clockwise direction?

The White Tower could be described as the beating heart of the Tower of London.

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Saddlers Hall Cheapside | WW2 Photos

Images from East London showing the destruction from German bombs during World War Two. Images scanned from a genuine copy of The London Evening news magazine, handed down to me from my grandfather.

Saddler’s Hall – 40 Gutter Lane London

The following account was written just after the War ended. Between Foster Lane and Gutter Lane, and behind Cheapside’s north facade,

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Fore Street Textile Warehouse | WW2 Photos

Images from East London showing the destruction from German bombs during World War Two. Images scanned from a genuine copy of The London Evening news magazine, handed down to me from my grandfather.

Textile Warehouse – Fore Street London

In Fore Street one of the largest wholesale textile warehouses in the City went up in flames between December 29th / 30th,

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Brewers Quay Port of London | WW2 Photos

Images from East London showing the destruction from German bombs during World War Two. Images scanned from a genuine copy of The London Evening news magazine, handed down to me from my grandfather.

Brewers Quay – Tower Stairs

One of the oldest wharves in the Port of London was hit several times in Germany’s earliest attacks on the Port.

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Cannon Street London | WW2 Photos

Images from East London showing the destruction from German bombs during World War Two. Images scanned from a genuine copy of The London Evening news magazine, handed down to me from my grandfather.

Cannon Street and The Blitz

One result of Germany’s fire blitz on the night of December 29th, 1940, when St. Paul’s Cathedral was ringed by fire, and of bomb explosions four months later,

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Manchester Hotel | Aldersgate Street | WW2 Photos

Images from East London showing the destruction from German bombs during World War Two. Images scanned from a genuine copy of The London Evening news magazine, handed down to me from my grandfather.

Manchester Hotel – Aldersgate Street London

The Manchester Hotel, at the corner of Aldersgate Street and Long Lane was attacked by German bombs in December 1940, and gutted by the subsequent fire.

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All Hallows Barking | WW2 Photos

Images from East London showing the destruction from German bombs during World War Two. Images scanned from a genuine copy of The London Evening news magazine, handed down to me from my grandfather.

All Hallows by the Tower – Byward Street

Founded in 675, it is one of the oldest churches in London. Toc H church, All Hallows Barking was blasted by German bombs in December 1940 and three weeks later was completely burned out.

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London City Mission | Bridewell Place | WW2 Photos

Images from East London showing the destruction from German bombs during World War Two. Images scanned from a genuine copy of The London Evening news magazine, handed down to me from my grandfather.

London City Mission – Bridewell Place EC4

When German bombs came to Bridewell Place on December 29th, 1940, two top floors of London City Mission were destroyed.

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Hackney a Brief History

Although Hackney sits in the very heart of the busy East End, we should not forget that this area was once a small rural series of hamlets. It became popular with medieval royals as an area close to London where they could relax and enjoy the outdoor life and over the years Hackney developed into one of the most cosmopolitan parts of London. Rich in history, there are also plenty of things to see and do if you come to E8 for a visit.

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The Hackney Empire History

The Hackney Empire is probably the best known theatre in the East End that is still open for business. This was one of the main music hall theatres to entertain local East Enders in Victorian times and it has seen more than a few past and present well-known names grace its stage during its time.

The building of the Hackney Empire

The theatre was originally constructed in 1901 as a music hall by the famous theatre architect,

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The History of Sutton House Hackney

Although much of the East End has been renovated over the years and the area is seen as being more modern than traditional, you can still find historical buildings in the area that hark back to older times. A visit to Hackney, for example, could include a trip to an authentic Grade II listed Tudor house, Sutton House.

Tudor London – Visiting Sutton House in Hackney

This is considered to be the oldest residential building in the Hackney area and,

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Visit Hackney Museum

If you find yourself with some time to spare in Hackney, perhaps after or before a visit to the area’s Tudor Sutton House or Roman Road market, then you may enjoy popping into the local museum on Reading Lane.


Established in 2002, this museum gives you an interesting insight into the lives of the people who have lived in this area of the East End and even gives you a chance to take a look at the famous Hackney Hoard!

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History of St Augustine’s Tower Hackney

Little remains of the original 16th century parish church that once stood in Hackney and served the local population’s religious needs for centuries. But, luckily, its historic church tower has been preserved even though the church itself was demolished in 1798.


If you find yourself in the Hackney area on a day when it is open to the public, it gives you the perfect chance to take a look around a Grade I listed church tower with some exceptional 16th century features and a fantastic panoramic view over London.

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Visit Spitalfields City Farm

If you’re visiting London and you want some time out away from city life, then the East End’s Spitalfields area has the ideal solution for you. In the middle of the urban East End, just ten minutes’ walk from Liverpool Street station, you can visit the rural tranquillity of the Spitalfields City Farm.

This is an especially great place to visit if you have been dragging the kids around London and want to do something that appeals to them!

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History of House Mill on Three Mills Island

The East End of London started life as a predominantly rural area. However, its proximity to the edge of the city and its easy access to water soon turned it into the capital’s industrial heart. If you are interested in learning more about the city’s milling heritage, then make a visit to the House Mill. Located close to the Olympic Park, in the heart of the East End, the mill is the oldest and largest tidal mill in the country.

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Visit Newham City Farm

If you find yourself in the Beckton area of the East End, then make sure to make a visit to the Newham City Farm, especially if you have animal loving kids with you.


This is one of London’s oldest and most popular city farms, giving you a chance to spend some time with over 200 different kinds of animals in a rural oasis right in the heart of the city’s East End.

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Visit The Whitechapel Art Gallery

You may not automatically associate London’s East End with art galleries, but the area is home to many famous and popular venues, including the Whitechapel Gallery. Founded in the early 20th century, this gallery has hosted many famous exhibitions over the years and has had a major part to play in the development of many British artists. It is well worth a visit if you find yourself in the Whitechapel area.

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Visit Mudchute Park and Farm

The East End’s Isle of Dogs may not be the first place you think about visiting when you want to enjoy green spaces and fresh air, but the local Mudchute community on the island has created a lovely park with a large city farm that is well worth a visit.


This really is a get-away-from-it-all green experience in the heart of urban London.

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History of Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

Visiting a cemetery may not seem like a whole load of fun, but if you find yourself near Mile End then you should take a detour to the Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park. The site was once one of the largest cemeteries in London, but it is now an impressive woodlands nature reserve.


You may just recognise the park when you get there,

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History of The Isle of Dogs London

Once a rural and relatively wild area of marshland that was mainly used for animal pasture, the Isle of Dogs is now the financial hub of London. Home to the impressive skyscrapers of Canary Wharf, this area has seen some massive changes and events over the centuries and is well worth a visit if you want to see how old and new London can live side by side.

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Visit London’s Last Lighthouse

If you find yourself in Leamouth in the East End’s Tower Hamlets area, you will be able to see the last remaining lighthouse still standing in London. Also known as Bow Creek lighthouse, the wharf buildings around the lighthouse are now used as an arts centre and creative work space, which is open to visitors.


The lighthouse itself is no longer in use,

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The Vestry House Museum

If you are visiting Walthamstow, you can easily pass a few hours in its local museum, Vestry House. This charming building is Grade II listed and has been used for various purposes over the years, spending some years as a workhouse and a few as a police station.


Located in the pretty streets of Walthamstow Village, it is now the local museum and archives store for the Walthamstow area.

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The William Morris Gallery

Lloyd Park in Walthamstow is home to a museum dedicated to the famous English designer and craftsman, William Morris. Morris was a member of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood design circle and was also one of the founders of the Arts and Craft movement.


In addition to his design work, Morris also wrote poetry and prose romances and ran a private printing press.

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The History of Bow Church London

There has been a church at Bow in East London for over 700 years; even after various restoration works parts of its current buildings date back to the 1490s. Over the years, the church has played a part in some major historical events, from Catholic executions ordered by Mary I through to bomb damage in the Second World War.


It is also given a nod in the children’s nursery rhyme “Oranges and Lemons” – this is the home of the great bell of Bow.

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History of Poplar East London

Poplar is perhaps best known at the moment as the setting for the popular Call the Midwife books and TV series. But, this area of the East End has a lot more history to it than that. It was the location for some of the worst damage inflicted on this area of London in both world wars and can even lay claim to being the home of the one of the most famous pirates of the 17th century.

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Spitalfields – East London Markets

If you find yourself close to Liverpool Street station with a bit of time on your hands, or feel like a visit to one of London’s best markets, then a visit to Spitalfields Market may be a good idea. There has been a market on this site, in various guises, since the 13th century and this was once the site of London’s largest fruit and vegetable wholesale market.

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London 2012 Olympics – The Legacy

Despite its strong industrial and docklands history, the East End of London became one of the poorest and most deprived areas of the capital from the 1960s onwards. Its docklands industry moved into other areas and many of the commercial businesses that supported the area closed down or moved away.


News that the 2012 Olympics were going to be held in the heart of the East End in Stratford could be nothing but good news for the area,

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History of Canning Town East London

Like large parts of the East End, Canning Town once had a strong industrial heritage, but the area was originally marshland. As such, for many centuries, the only way to reach Canning Town was to boat or by paying to use a toll bridge. The area opened up in the early 19th century when the Barking Road was built.

This brought with it a larger bridge and more opportunities for connections with the rest of East London.

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Bow Back Rivers London History

Although we tend to assume that the East End of London is a primarily industrial and urban area, it actually started life as a rural area, mainly composed of agricultural land or marshland.


It also has some interesting waterways running though it that date back for centuries, such as the Bow Back Rivers, also sometimes called the Stratford Back Rivers or the Stratford Back Streams.

Read more…



Recent Comments

  • Dave Dunsdon on Second World War Bombing Raid South Hallsville SchoolJames dunsdon was my grandad survived by my nan mary and her boys jim len and my dad ron they lost my grandad james when my dad was six bombed in the school
  • Tony Dailde on East End Gangsters, The KraysPlease don’t glorify murderous violent criminals . How can you love or be a fan of people who murder?
  • Tony Dailde on East End Gangsters, The KraysPlease don’t glorify murderous violent criminals
  • Derek Bailey on Visit Wapping in Historic East LondonMy brothers and I lived in Jackman House which is off of Wapping High Street at Watts Street in the the late 1950's. Jackman was part of what was known as the Wapping housing estate began by the LCC in 1926. Anyone out there who lived on that estate back
  • Sandie on History of Canning Town East LondonMy Mum & Dad lived in Malmsbury Rd with my brother Jimmy I was born Hospt 1947 Surname Crabb
  • sue willis on History of The Isle of Dogs LondonHi as the children of an Islander my brother & I are regular readers of Isle of Dogs Lives & we were especially pleased to see an article on Alpha Grove. Does anyone remember the Bircham family firstly of Mellish Street & then no 67 Alpha Grove? They were George
  • John Dallman on Brick Lane History, East LondonI grew up in Flower & Dean street off of Brick Lane 1559 - 1970. I lived in a late Victorian tenement block called Ruth house (Demolished) I remember Brick Lane when most of the shops were Jewish and what is now a mosque was a synagogue. I remember going
  • Vicki M Kay on The Sinking of The Princess AliceMy 3rd great grandfather Filmer Kidston was abourd with his second wife Elizabeth, their two sons and two girls and a boy from his wife’s previous marriage. Filmer spent about 45 minutes in the water with one of his sons before they were rescued. His wife was found drowned almost
  • Dave Bamber on V1 and V2 Rocket Attacks in East LondonJuly 3rd 1944 30 Twickenham Road, Isleworth. Does anyone have any information about the bomb that destroyed my Aunt`s house. Her name was Evelyn May Bamber and she was killed. Many thanks, Dave Bamber.
  • Bill Nicholson on Poplar Upper North Street School DisasterHello Stanley I'm disappointed to have missed the centenary of this dreadful act - I visited the area during 2012 and hoped to be able to visit again. Anyway I decided to look it up following the centenary of the end of WW1 this weekend. My mum (Olive Clayson) was
  • Janice Brown Josch on Coventry Road Ilford EssexI come from Canning Town, but about 30 years ago my now husband, Ulf, came from Germany to work at Mattessons in West Ham. He rented a room in a house in Coventry Road.
  • Janice Brown Josch on History of Canning Town East LondonHello everyone .. did anyone know my now late father, Charles Brown? Lived in RavensCroft Road, his mother (remarried) Eileen Thorp
  • Shirley Runnalls (Wallis) on History of the Royal London HospitalJust read the history, brought back memories as I was SET 326 at Tredegar' Sad to hear the uniform is no longer used. We have a film in Cornwall re Edith Cavell Tomorrow so I have old LH newspapers re her plus photo of Edith Cavell Home also LH badge
  • Kellie Fennell on History of Canning Town East LondonHi Robert I come from canning town and there are a few really good Facebook sites...canning town memories...start with this one and they will advise you on another one where they help you trace people from the area...I'm sure someone will be able to help you on there. ..good luck
  • Lola on Brick Lane History, East LondonThis article is so off base. I've lived around brick lane for years and never heard anyone call it Banglatown. And the curry restaurants are appalling. They rip you off. They ran on a few years of reputation but started scamming on quality or watering down wine thinking people wouldn't

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